Divorce Mediation Group

The prospect of ending your marriage can be devastating, but divorce proceedings don’t have to be traumatic. Divorce mediation is an affordable alternative to litigating in court for resolving all family law issues before, during, and after the divorce or legal separation. Both parties meet with a trained, impartial family law mediator to resolve issues in a confidential setting 

  • Free and Confidential Consultation

    Learn about our free and confidential divorce mediation consultation.

  • Divorce Mediation Blog

    Read informative articles from our Divorce Mediation Group program manager, Kim Werner

Our Mission Statement is to provide those in divorce a civil, sensible, cost-effective alternative to litigation. We provide a comfortable, private setting with an experienced family law mediator, allowing the parties to control the outcome of important decisions about their family and property.

Our mediators are family law attorneys who help you reach your own agreements on issues of custody, child and spousal support (alimony), and/or division of assets and debts. The divorce mediator provides substantive information about divorce laws and court procedures, so you can make reasonable decisions for yourselves.

To learn more, visit our Divorce Mediation FAQ’s

Family Law Issues for Mediation

  • Divorce
  • Post-divorce Modification
  • Paternity
  • Unmarried Couples
  • Legal Separation
  • Division of Assets and Debts
  • Spousal Support (Alimony)
  • Custody/Parenting
  • Child Support


10 Reasons to Choose Mediation for
Your Divorce

More and more people are choosing divorce mediation. Let’s look at some of the benefits of this option include:

1. It Costs Less »

The parties usually share the cost of mediation, which is commonly between $2,000 and $6,000 total for a divorce from start to finish. Fees for a typical litigated divorce  can run up to $40,000 per party. 
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2. The Parties Have Control »

In divorce mediation, the parties control how quickly or slowly decisions are made, when the divorce petition is filed and what the terms of the divorce will be, in contrast to litigation where attorneys set court dates, and judges make decisions with limited time and information.
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3. Paperwork Prepared »

Many parties try to do their own divorce these days, but they run into difficulty trying to understand the laws and the confusing paperwork involved. A mediator, who is also an attorney, can prepare and file all of the paperwork in divorce. 
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4. Easier on the Children »

Conflict between parents usually trickles down to their kids, but when the parties work together, it helps the family move forward more smoothly.
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5. Easier on the Parties »

When parties use a mediator to help communicate and make important decisions, they work together in a spirit of cooperation, avoiding a hurtful and expensive court battle. 
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6. Parties Can Still Go to Court »

The parties do not give up the right to go to court. If they cannot resolve their issues in mediation, they may opt out and retain attorneys, and ask the judge decide the unresolved issues.
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7. Parties Receive Legal Information »

While an attorney acting in the role of a mediator cannot give either party legal advice, he or she can share legal information and general knowledge of how a court might address the specific issues in a case.
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8. Emotions Can Be Managed »

Both parties want to be heard and understood in the divorce process. A trained mediator can help parties address your emotions without allowing them to dominate the decision-making process.
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9. It is Confidential »

Discussions and tentative agreements are confidential, so it’s easier  to make offers and consider alternatives in mediation. No one gives up there legal rights by trying mediation, and what is said in mediation may not be repeated in court.
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10. It Builds on the Positive »

In mediation, parties are encouraged to find common ground for making agreements. The focus is on decisions about the future, not past behavior.
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